Obermayer Family Matters

Obermayer Family Matters

Category Archives: Alimony

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Can Alimony Be Changed After a Divorce?

Posted in Alimony
The simple answer is YES! Alimony is always reviewable based upon a substantial change in either party’s financial circumstances. However, in general terms, we usually see the payor spouse (the one paying the alimony) file these applications. As an example, if the payor spouse loses his/her job or suddenly becomes seriously ill, then that spouse… Continue Reading

AAML Opposition to Repeal of the Alimony Tax Deduction

Posted in Alimony
We blogged recently about the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act which, in part, eliminates the tax consequences of alimony. To briefly recap, alimony is tax-deductible to the payor and taxable as income to the recipient under the current tax laws. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, however, revises the tax code to completely eliminate… Continue Reading

The Revised U.S. Tax Code’s Impact On Alimony

Posted in Alimony
By now most people are aware of the impending changes to the U.S. tax code brought about by the GOP tax bill, dubbed the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,” which Congress voted to pass on December 20, 2017. These substantial changes, which are widely regarded as the most significant overhaul of the tax code in… Continue Reading

What the New Alimony Law in New Jersey Means for You

Posted in Alimony, New Jersey, Support
On September 10, 2014, Governor Chris Christie signed an alimony reform bill into law, which makes significant changes to the New Jersey alimony statute, N.J.S.A. 2A:34-23. While the new law does not create alimony guidelines, it imposes restrictions on the duration of alimony and provides guidance on when alimony may be reduced, suspended or terminated.… Continue Reading

How do I get a “legal separation” in Pennsylvania?

Posted in Alimony, Child Support, Custody, Divorce, Marital Property, Pennsylvania, Separation, Support
You don’t! Unlike several other states, Pennsylvania does not require separating parties to go to court and request that a judge issue a formal decree separating the parties. Rather, separating parties in Pennsylvania may enter in to private agreements, setting forth the terms of their separation. Common issues that arise during the separation period are… Continue Reading